Wardlaw Mausoleum

Wardlaw Mausoleum - the burial place of the Lovat Clan Chiefs

From 1632 Wardlaw Mausoleum was the burial place of Lord Lovats, the Lovat Clan Chiefs having ignored the traditional burial ground at Beauly abbey.

The Mausoleum was completed 1634/5 but later fell into disrepair, major renovation took place allowing it to be reopened in 1998.

There are a number of mural plaques, to the various Fraser branches on the walls, including one to Rev James Fraser of Phopachy, the author of the Wardlaw Manuscripts (The true genealogy of the Frasers).

The most famous memorial was raised by Simon, the Red Fox, to his father Thomas, 10th Lord Lovat. Wardlaw-Mausoleum4.jpgIn 1745 he supported the Stuart claim to the crown of Scotland joining the Jacobite army and was among the Highlanders defeated at the Battle of Culloden, he was captured convicted of treason against the Crown and beheaded on 9th April 1747 on Tower Hill, London. He was the last man in Britain to beheaded. His estates and titles were forfeited to the Crown. Below there is a crypt, a private burial chamber, where the Red Fox and his immediate family are buried. It isn't certain he is in there, after his beheading at the Tower of London, it is said his body was smuggled back. Whether or not this was achieved is open to debate.

From the tower at Wardlaw Mausoleum there are stunning views over what was once Lovat Castle, (today you can only see outlines of the castle), to the Beauly Firth. The field in front of the Castle is where the Frasers of Lovat would have assembled in times of trouble. The Clan war-cry A'Mhorfhaich was taken from the fields name.

Wardlaw Mausoleum is Open:-

April-September, Wednesdays AND Saturdays, 11-12 and 2-4. Admission is free.